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SOS Rhino : In the News : More Than 1,000 Animals to Be Moved to Mozambique
 

More Than 1,000 Animals to Be Moved to Mozambique

 

African Eye News Service (Nelspruit)
June 19, 2003
Sharon Hammond
Skukuza

The Kruger National Park's game capture team is gearing up for another huge animal translocation programme as part of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park (GLTP) initiative.

More than 1 000 animals like giraffe, impala, wildebeest, zebra and waterbuck will be captured from now until August and moved to the 35 000 hectare animal sanctuary in the Limpopo National Park (LNP) in Mozambique.

This massive translocation exercise will culminate in four families of about 40 elephants being moved to the LNP in the first week of September to coincide with the World Parks Congress (WPC), which will be held in Durban.

One elephant family will also be captured and moved to coincide with the African Union Summit on July 6.

Head of the game capture team, Dr Markus Hofmeyr, says any animals such as rhino or elephant found outside the LNP sanctuary will also be caught and put in the fenced area for their safety.

Animal translocation from the Kruger to the LNP began in 2001 when the first group of elephants were translocated.

The speed of the translocations is important because the sooner the animals are translocated, the sooner their numbers will start increasing naturally to populate the envisioned GLTP.

South Africa's President Thabo Mbeki, Mozambican President Joachim Chissano and Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe signed the treaty for the establishment of the GLTP on December 9, 2002 in Xai-Xai, Mozambique.

The GLTP comprises the LNP in Mozambique, the Kruger and Makuleke Contractual Area in South Africa, and the Sengwe Corridor, Gonarezhou National Park, Malipati Safari Area and Manjinji Pan Sanctuary in Zimbabwe.

Fences will be dropped between the countries to create what will be the world's largest conservation area.


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