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  SOS Rhino : In The News : Newsletter : January 2005


SOS Rhino Review
January 2005

Welcome to the SOS Rhino Review, a newsletter about rhinos from SOS Rhino. You'll find links to interesting articles here as well as a few surprises! We have provided some updates on our efforts to save rhinos all over the world. Let us know if you'd rather not receive this newsletter.

And now, let's go to the rhino news.

1. About Us
2. World Rhino News
3. Feature Stories
4. Donor Appreciation
5. Find It On Our Web Site
6. Trivia Questions
7. How You Can Help
8. Trivia Answers


Full Stories Are Available Via Web Links

1. About Us

SOS Rhino is a non-profit, international foundation dedicated to preserving the five rhinoceros species in their natural habitats. Our conservation programs combine research, education, marketing and advocacy, all working collectively to achieve sustainable results.

Through diverse stakeholder support, SOS Rhino develops and funds rhino conservation and awareness programs appropriate to individual countries, providing these countries with the information and tools to build lasting rhino conservation.

It is our goal to secure a place for this ancient animal in tomorrow’s world.

Click to read the full news article

2. World Rhino News

Rhino charges back from brink of extinction
India's endangered one-horned rhinos are fighting back from the throes of death despite increasing demand for their horns in the international market.

Until a few years ago, the Kaziranga National Park in the northeastern state of Assam echoed with sounds of staccato gunfire as the noble beast became the target of poacher gangs - up to 600 of the pachyderms were killed for their horns between 1985 to 2000.

Click to read the full news article


Cutting-edge conservationists
It was like a scene straight out of mafia drama The Sopranos and spy series Alias, but played for real, featuring a Chinese underworld boss with a fleet of Mercedes-Benzs, armed goons, sexy molls and a host of military officials on his pay-roll. His business? Smuggling rhino horns and tiger bones for the lucrative Chinese medicine market. This was China in the early 1990s. "At the time, China and Taiwan claimed there was no illegal rhino trade," said environmental detective Steve Galster. "No action was taken. In 100 years, the rhino population had shrunk by about 95%."

Click to read the full news article

3. Featured Stories

The Rhinoceros of Mount Kinabalu
The rhinoceros is never easily seen in its original haunts and many naturalists or hunters have been sorely put to the test. For instance, Theodore Hubback, writing in 1939 at a time when rhinos were more plentiful than today, said that 'of all the difficult and exasperating animals through dense jungle the rhinoceros easily takes first place. They invariably go through the thickest undergrowth they can find and deliberately leave a game path to go through, or under, or over, some fallen tree which appeals to their sense of humor, I suppose.'

Click to read the full news article


4. Donor Appreciation

SOS RHINO wishes to acknowledge the following individuals, organizations, and foundations for their generous support of our programs. Their support comes in many forms: donation of their expertise and time, funds for specific programs and equipment, and donation of products. THANK YOU!

Click HERE to view the list of our donors!

 

5. Find It On Our Web Site

BORNEO RHINO CHALLENGE 2005
Trek, Cycle, and Quest for the Sumatran Rhino of Borneo

SOS RHINO invites you to climb to the summit of Mt. Kinabalu, cycle the Northern tip of Borneo, and help us search for the elusive Sumatran rhinoceros of Borneo. You’ll see an astonishing variety of rare and endemic plants, primates, and birds during your trek and cycle in some of the most beautiful areas of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. As part of the challenge you will join SOS Rhino’s field staff deep in the jungles of Tabin Wildlife Reserve, in search of the last remaining small, shy forest rhinos of Malaysian Borneo.

Click to read the full news article


6. Trivia Questions


1. True or False: There are less than 70 Javan rhinos alive today

2. Why has the white rhinoceros developed a wide, square lip?

3. Name the five (5) rhino species surviving today.


7. How You Can Help

Participate in SOS Rhino’s Annual Borneo Rhino Challenge Fundraiser
As part of the challenge you will join SOS Rhino’s field staff deep in the jungles of Tabin Wildlife Reserve, in search of the last remaining small, shy forest rhinos of Malaysian Borneo.

Click to read the full news article

Adopt a rhino, doc or keeper. Buy a t-shirt, hat, or video
There are only 300 Sumatran rhinos left on Earth. Without direct help from generous humans, they may never be seen again. We urge you to give what you can in the form of a donation – protect a rhino or adopt a rhino, doc, researcher, keeper, or purchase one of SOS Rhino’s products: a T-shirt, hat, or video. Visit today, and give from your heart.

Click to read the full news article

Contribute to the “SOS Rhino Annelisa Memorial Fund”
SOS Rhino has established memorial fund in Dr. Annelisa Kilbourn’s name to help continue her work dedicated to the survival of the Sumatran rhino in Malaysia. Contributions can be made by clicking the button below or mailed directly to SOS Rhino (checks should be made out to “SOS RHINO”)680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60611. attn: Annelisa Fund. 312.335.0868, fax 312.335.0076. Inquires emailed to info@sosrhino.org.

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Volunteer
SOS RHINO is looking for volunteers interested in helping us in our efforts to save the Sumatran rhinoceros. Our Borneo Team is studying the demographics of the remaining animals in Tabin Wildlife Reserve to determine when patrol units, habitat protection, or translocation may play a role in the rhinos' survival. Read more:

Click to read the full news article



8. Trivia Answers


1. True. Rhino populations are declining due to poaching and habitat destruction.

2. The white rhinoceros spends much of its time "grazing". The wide, square lip helps in cutting the sharp grass.

3. Asian one-horned, white, black, Javan, Sumatran  




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