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  SOS Rhino : In The News : Newsletter : July 2005


SOS Rhino Review
July 2005

Welcome to the SOS Rhino Review, a newsletter about rhinos from SOS Rhino. You'll find links to interesting articles here as well as a few surprises! We have provided some updates on our efforts to save rhinos all over the world. Let us know if you'd rather not receive this newsletter.

And now, let's go to the rhino news.

1. Feature Stories
2. World Rhino News
3. Donor Appreciation
4. Find It On Our Web Site
5. Trivia Questions
6. How You Can Help
7. Trivia Answers
8. About Us


Full Stories Are Available Via Web Links

 

1. Feature Stories

MONTHLY FIELD REPORT
MAY 2005

By Dr. Edwin Bosi

May 1st is Labor Day, a public holiday in Malaysia to honor the hard working people of the Nation. As the 1st of May fell on Sunday, the following Monday is automatically a public holiday. But for us in the conservation work, everyday seems a great day for working. Today, we headed for another rhino survey along the Tabin river. With me was Dr. Janna Wynne, a senior veterinarian at Los Angeles Zoo and my assistants - Suzali, Amit, Frederic and Yusri.

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2. World Rhino News

Poaching Declining In Swaziland
In the little kingdom of Swaziland, a tough animal preservation law has cut poaching by 90 percent since its enactment ten years ago, while the bloody extinction of rhino has come entirely to a halt.

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Armed Conflict Impact On Conservation
EDITORIAL/OPINION
WHEN the census takers were counting the greater one-horned rhinoceros in the jungles of Chitwan valley recently, it was not only the 170 big animals that had disappeared. Something else, equally important from the conservation perspective, were also missing. The number of security posts that guarded the world's rare animals had also vanished to worrisome levels.

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3. Donor Appreciation

SOS RHINO wishes to acknowledge the following individuals, organizations, and foundations for their generous support of our programs. Their support comes in many forms: donation of their expertise and time, funds for specific programs and equipment, and donation of products. THANK YOU!

Click HERE to view the list of our donors!

4. Find It On Our Web Site

Rhino Links
These are organizations and institutions that SOS Rhino works with or has worked with, knows, or just thinks you should know. It is by no means complete. If you have other links you think should be listed on this site, send their addresses and some information on the organizations to info@sosrhino.org.

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5. Trivia Questions


1. TRUE OR FALSE:  All rhinoceros species have hair on their bodies.

2. Why do rhinos have horns?

3. When and where was the Javan rhino “rediscovered”?


6 . How You Can Help

Adopt a rhino, doc or keeper. Buy a t-shirt, hat, or video
There are only 300 Sumatran rhinos left on Earth. Without direct help from generous humans, they may never be seen again. We urge you to give what you can in the form of a donation – protect a rhino or adopt a rhino, doc, researcher, keeper, or purchase one of SOS Rhino’s products: a T-shirt, hat, or video. Visit today, and give from your heart.

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Contribute to the “SOS Rhino Annelisa Memorial Fund”
SOS Rhino has established memorial fund in Dr. Annelisa Kilbourn’s name to help continue her work dedicated to the survival of the Sumatran rhino in Malaysia. Contributions can be made by clicking the button below or mailed directly to SOS Rhino (checks should be made out to “SOS RHINO”)680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60611. attn: Annelisa Fund. 312.335.0868, fax 312.335.0076. Inquires emailed to info@sosrhino.org.

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Volunteer
SOS RHINO is looking for volunteers interested in helping us in our efforts to save the Sumatran rhinoceros. Our Borneo Team is studying the demographics of the remaining animals in Tabin Wildlife Reserve to determine when patrol units, habitat protection, or translocation may play a role in the rhinos' survival. Read more:

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7. Trivia Answers


1. TRUE. All rhinoceros species have hairs at the end of the tail and on the fringes of the ear.  They also have eyelashes.  Only the Sumatran rhinoceros has visible body hairs, even to the extent that some animals were described as 'hairy rhinoceros'.  Most of this body hair disappears when the animal grows older.  In the other species of rhinoceros, there is no obvious presence of body hair.  Anatomically, the hair follicles are present, which means that hairs will develop but not show above the surface of the skin.

2. The horns are very well developed in the two species in Africa (black and white rhinos), but much smaller in the three species in Asia (Sumatran with 2 very small horns, Indian and Javan with one horn).  The Asian species certainly do not use the horns to fight or to defend themselves, they use their incisors (sharp front teeth for the purpose). The horns have come about in evolution and they had (have) a general function to impress members of the opposite sex.  Horns are also used for digging in waterbeds to find water, or to uproot shrubs etc.  Some rhinos use the horn to guide their offspring.  This is generally the front horn, the second horn does not have a very specific purpose at the moment.  We suppose that they had some purpose in the course of evolution.

3. The best known population of Javan rhinos can be found in Ujung Kulon National Park in Western Java. A second remaining pocket of Javan rhinos was discovered in Vietnam in 1988, in an area known as Cat Loc Forest Reserve.

8. About Us

SOS Rhino is a non-profit, international foundation dedicated to preserving the five rhinoceros species in their natural habitats. Our conservation programs combine research, education, marketing and advocacy, all working collectively to achieve sustainable results.

Through diverse stakeholder support, SOS Rhino develops and funds rhino conservation and awareness programs appropriate to individual countries, providing these countries with the information and tools to build lasting rhino conservation.

It is our goal to secure a place for this ancient animal in tomorrow’s world.

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