SOS Rhino Specials
Rhino Species
Rhino FAQ
   


More Newsletters::

Current
Archive

  SOS Rhino : In The News : Newsletter : August 2002


SOS Rhino Review
August 2002

Welcome to the SOS Rhino Review, a newsletter about rhinos from SOS Rhino. You'll find links to interesting articles here as well as a few surprises! We have provided some updates on our efforts to save rhinos all over the world. If you'd rather not receive this newsletter, simply reply to this e-mail and type "Unsubscribe" in the subject field.

And now, let's go to the rhino news.

1. World Rhino News
2. Feature Stories
3. Donor Appreciation
4. Find It On Our Web Site
5. Trivia Questions
6. How You Can Help
7. Trivia Answers


Full Stories Are Available Via Web Links
-----------------------------------------------------------

1. World Rhino News

Friendship? Learn it from the rhinos
JOHANNESBURG: Zoologists have a little tale to tell about rhinos. It seems these intimidating beasts take companionship seriously, with most of them forming pairs that are mutually helpful. No other animal has been observed to form buddy pairs in this way, says Ron Swaisgood, who studies animal behaviour at San Diego Zoo in California.

Click to read the full news article


Flood waters in India engulf world's largest habitat of one-horned rhino
GAUHATI, India - Flood waters have engulfed the world's largest habitat of the one-horned rhino in northeastern India, forcing the endangered animals to move across a busy highway to seek safety on higher ground.

Click to read the full news article



-----------------------------------------------------------

2. Feature Stories

Rhino Subspecies is found only in Sabah
KOTA KINABALU: Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni, a subspecies of the Sumatran rhino can only be found in Borneo. This docile animal has no enemy except man.

Click to read the full news article


Oil palm sector can help save wildlife
KOTA KINABALU: Representing some 29 percent of the country's 3.52 million hectacres of plantation areas, the oil palm sector may not only contribute to Sabah's economy but in conservation of wildlife.

Click to read the full news article

------------------------------------------------------------

3. Donor Appreciation

SOS RHINO wishes to acknowledge the following individuals, organizations, and foundations for their generous support of our programs. Their support comes in many forms: donation of their expertise and time, funds for specific programs and equipment, and donation of products. THANK YOU!



Betsy and Rick Schaffer Ashley Schaffer
Charlene Pedersen Yuristian Amadin
Christen Schaffer Joyce and Mark Fleming
Daniel Andersen Liza Wiid
Dave and Laura Hall Barbara Marshall
Douglas Furtek Vachira Tontrakulpaibul
Dr. Richard Schaffer Elias Sadalla-Filho
Ellen and Jim Roberts Marie and Bab O'Brien
Erin Fleming Laura Fleming
Jimmie Reid Pat Harrison
Julia Ferguson Rebecca Spear
Justin Mikah Lee Foo Hwa
Donna Bruno Brian McKee
Tim Duffin Diane B. Monsivais
Judy Whitaker Frederick Furtek
Janet Liew Eleanor Howe
Don & Jill Hall  
   
Ultra Source Rainbow Ridge
Equitek Sonosite
Handspring Foundation VisualMedia
Jaybee Singapore Zoological Gardens
WriteBrain Productions RhinoSkin/Saunders
North Bank, Chicago IL  

The "Magic Horn" Ultimate Frisbee Team:
Megan Brennan, Wade Callahan, Suzy Friedman, Charlie Goblet, Carter Johnson, Dave Kahle, Doug Kirk, Frank Kuhr, Neema Navai, Katie O’Rourke, Kenny Outcalt, Katherine Patnode, Bob Pearl, Barrett Ruemping, Mike Tomaszewski, Cherie Weinewuth

-----------------------------------------------------------

4. Find It On Our Web Site

RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHIES
Our fellow researchers have expressed an interest for a central rhino research depository. In response, we have developed a compendium of research bibliographies we hope will assist anyone interested in research on rhinos. View Research Bibliographies...

This list will be updated on a regular basis. Similarly, if you become aware of any published citations, please e-mail us info@sosrhino.org

SOS RHINO BORNEO

SOS Rhino's Borneo Project has two main goals:
IN-SITU: protection/expansion of the population in the wild by supporting rhino protection and survey teams by providing them with the latest survey technologies and techniques.
Learn more...

EX-SITU: successful breeding and health evaluation of the two rhinos in captivity at Sepilok by routine sample and data collection, hormone profiles, ultrasound evaluation, management/husbandry, and breeding.
Learn more...


------------------------------------------------------------

5. Trivia Questions

1. TRUE OR FALSE: Scientists believe that rhinos share the same order as horses and tapirs because of the shape of their skull, dental structure, and toes.

2. When was the black rhino added to the endangered species list?

3. Why is the rhino species, Ceratotherium simum, commonly called the "white" rhinoceros?

-----------------------------------------------------------

6. How You Can Help

There are only 300 Sumatran rhinos left on Earth. Without direct help from generous humans, they may never be seen again. We urge you to give what you can in the form of a donation - protect a rhino or adopt a rhino, doc, researcher, keeper, or purchase one of SOS Rhino's products: a T-shirt, hat, or video. Visit our Donate page today, and give from your heart.

-----------------------------------------------------------

7. Trivia Answers

1. TRUE. Rhinos, horses, and tapirs are classified in the order Perissodactyla (odd-toed animals).

2. The international body that presents lists of endangered species is the
Species Survival Commission of the World Conservation Union (IUCN). Their first lists appeared in the 1960's and the black rhino has been on the list since the beginning.

3. The common name, white rhinoceros, comes from the Afrikaans word describing its mouth: weit, meaning "wide".


 





Privacy Policy