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  SOS Rhino : In The News : Newsletter : August 2005


SOS Rhino Review
August 2005

Welcome to the SOS Rhino Review, a newsletter about rhinos from SOS Rhino. You’ll find links to interesting articles here as well as updates on our efforts to save rhinos all over the world. Let us know if you’d rather not receive this newsletter.

And now, let's go to the rhino news.

1. Feature Stories
2. World Rhino News
3. Donor Appreciation
4. Find It On Our Web Site
5. Trivia Questions
6. How You Can Help
7. Trivia Answers
8. About Us


Full Stories Are Available Via Web Links

 

1. Feature Stories

MONTHLY FIELD REPORT
June 2005
Cathy Dean, Director of Save the Rhino International was in Sabah from 27th June 2005. In the afternoon, I accompanied Cathy, her husband Kenneth and friend Nick Cobbutt to pay a courtesy call on Mr. Mahedi Andau, Director of Wildlife Department Sabah at his office. Andau’s deputy Mr. Laurentius Ambu and senior officer Ms. Jumrafiah Abdul Shukor were also present. Cathy took time to brief them about her organization and its role in rhino conservation. She specifically mentioned the current campaign of European zoos to save the rhinos.

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SEPILOK REPORT
February and March 2005
Steve Romo a Sumatran rhino keeper from Los Angeles Zoo came to visit us in Sepilok. Steve can be called "the father" of the first Sumatran rhino born in captivity. He had been head rhino keeper at the Cincinnati Zoo when the successful breeding was achieved. He took care of Andalas, the first Sumatran rhino born in captivity in 112 years, and he moved with him to Los Angeles Zoo when he grew older. Steve was also involved in the breeding program in Sungai Dusun, West Malaysia for two years.

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2. World Rhino News

Assamese youth initiate drive to save Kaziranga wild life
The youths of Assam have now stepped in to save the wildlife of the world famous Kaziranga National Park. Young men patrol through the night along the highways to prevent speeding vechicles from over-running wild animals crossing over during the monsoon season.

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Wild animals poaching control measures adopted
New strategies have been adopted to check the poaching and smuggling of wild animals of rare species like one-horned rhino in the Royal Chitwan National Park and around the park.

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3. Donor Appreciation

SOS RHINO wishes to acknowledge the following individuals, organizations, and foundations for their generous support of our programs. Their support comes in many forms: donation of their expertise and time, funds for specific programs and equipment, and donation of products. THANK YOU!

Click HERE to view the list of our donors!

4. Find It On Our Web Site

Our Partners in Conservation
SOS Rhino is committed to collaborating with conservation organizations and other groups from around the globe. Here is a list of our partners in conservation.

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5. Trivia Questions


1. TRUE OR FALSE: Rhino horns are not real horns.

2. What term is used to describe a congregation of rhinos?

3. Name the five (5) rhino species surviving today.


6 . How You Can Help

Adopt a rhino, doc or keeper. Buy a t-shirt, hat, or video
There are only 300 Sumatran rhinos left on Earth. Without direct help from generous humans, they may never be seen again. We urge you to give what you can in the form of a donation – protect a rhino or adopt a rhino, doc, researcher, keeper, or purchase one of SOS Rhino’s products: a T-shirt, hat, or video. Visit today, and give from your heart.

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Contribute to the “SOS Rhino Annelisa Memorial Fund”
SOS Rhino has established memorial fund in Dr. Annelisa Kilbourn’s name to help continue her work dedicated to the survival of the Sumatran rhino in Malaysia. Contributions can be made by clicking the button below or mailed directly to SOS Rhino (checks should be made out to “SOS RHINO”)680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60611. attn: Annelisa Fund. 312.335.0868, fax 312.335.0076. Inquires emailed to info@sosrhino.org.

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Volunteer
SOS RHINO is looking for volunteers interested in helping us in our efforts to save the Sumatran rhinoceros. Our Borneo Team is studying the demographics of the remaining animals in Tabin Wildlife Reserve to determine when patrol units, habitat protection, or translocation may play a role in the rhinos' survival. Read more:

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Participate in the Borneo Rhino Challenge 2006 Fundraiser
SOS RHINO invites you to climb to the summit of Mt. Kinabalu, cycle the Northern tip of Borneo, and help us search for the elusive Sumatran rhinoceros of Borneo. You'll see an astonishing variety of rare and endemic plants, primates, and birds during your trek and cycle in some of the most beautiful areas of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. As part of the challenge you will join SOS Rhino's field staff deep in the jungles of Tabin Wildlife Reserve, in search of the last remaining small, shy forest rhinos of Malaysian Borneo.

Click to read the full news article


7. Trivia Answers


1. TRUE. Rhino horn grows from the rhino's skin and not from the skull like a true horn.

2. Modern writers refer to a congregation of rhinoceroses as a "crash". This is sometimes found in crosswords or quizzes. "Herd" would not be zoologically correct because rhinos do not stay in one group for long. Scientists still use "groups" for the rhinoceros and it is a correct term.

3. Asian one-horned, white, black, Javan, Sumatran


8. About Us

SOS Rhino is a non-profit, international foundation dedicated to preserving the five rhinoceros species in their natural habitats. Our conservation programs combine research, education, marketing and advocacy, all working collectively to achieve sustainable results.

Through diverse stakeholder support, SOS Rhino develops and funds rhino conservation and awareness programs appropriate to individual countries, providing these countries with the information and tools to build lasting rhino conservation.

It is our goal to secure a place for this ancient animal in tomorrow’s world.

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