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  SOS Rhino : In The News : Newsletter : September 2005


SOS Rhino Review
September 2005

Welcome to the SOS Rhino Review, a newsletter about rhinos from SOS Rhino. You’ll find links to interesting articles here as well as updates on our efforts to save rhinos all over the world. Let us know if you’d rather not receive this newsletter.

And now, let's go to the rhino news.

1. Feature Stories
2. World Rhino News
3. Donor Appreciation
4. Find It On Our Web Site
5. Trivia Questions
6. How You Can Help
7. Trivia Answers
8. About Us


Full Stories Are Available Via Web Links

 

1. Feature Stories

MONTHLY FIELD REPORT : July 2005
By Dr. Edwin Bosi

As habitat is secured, one of the most revealing indicators is the ‘coolness’ of wild animals towards the presence of humans. One will be able to get very close to many of the ungulates and birds, at night or in the daylight. One of the most fascinating experience and observation in the tropical rainforest of Tabin in this case, is the quick exit by the Borneon gibbons when one approaches their feeding tree. They will also distance themselves from that tree if they know you are camping below or in close proximity. I wonder if they have reacted the same, when big mammals are around, say elephants, tembadau or rhinos.

I love to throw this type of question to my field staffs and volunteers. I must say the answer from Liza Hawley, a Sydney-based volunteer merits lots of points. She thinks that these gibbons must have a bad experience with human during the logging of Tabin forest in the eighties. The sound of heavy machines, thundering sounds of falling timber, gunshots probably and the noises and smell of humans may have a lasting impact on this ape. Let us see if the return of forest tranquility will once again revive the ecological balance and co-existence of man with the wildlife community.

Click to read the full news article

2. World Rhino News

Illegal Animal Trade Goes Online
Between November 2004 and January 2005, International Fund for Animal Welfare found thousands of endangered animals and animal products available for purchase over the internet, including a live Siberian tiger for $70,000, a lion, peregrine falcons and many medicines made from leopard, tiger, rhino and elephant parts.

Click to read the full news article

Hint of global link in poaching
Guwahati, Aug. 4: Forest department officials engaged in anti-poaching operations today said the failed attempt to kill a rhino in the Assam state zoo on Monday could be the handiwork of an international gang of poachers.

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3. Donor Appreciation

SOS RHINO wishes to acknowledge the following individuals, organizations, and foundations for their generous support of our programs. Their support comes in many forms: donation of their expertise and time, funds for specific programs and equipment, and donation of products. THANK YOU!

Click HERE to view the list of our donors!

4. Find It On Our Web Site

TREK, CYCLE, AND QUEST FOR THE SUMATRAN RHINO OF BORNEO
Borneo Rhino Challenge 2006
SOS RHINO invites you to climb to the summit of Mt. Kinabalu, cycle the Northern tip of Borneo, and help us search for the elusive Sumatran rhinoceros of Borneo. You'll see an astonishing variety of rare and endemic plants, primates, and birds during your trek and cycle in some of the most beautiful areas of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. As part of the challenge you will join SOS Rhino's field staff deep in the jungles of Tabin Wildlife Reserve, in search of the last remaining small, shy forest rhinos of Malaysian Borneo.

Click to read the full news article

5. Trivia Questions


1. TRUE OR FALSE: Rhino horns are not real horns.

2. How does the black rhino of Africa differ from the white rhino?

3. Is there a subspecies of the greater one-horned Indian rhinoceros?


6 . How You Can Help

Adopt a rhino, doc or keeper. Buy a t-shirt, hat, or video
There are only 300 Sumatran rhinos left on Earth. Without direct help from generous humans, they may never be seen again. We urge you to give what you can in the form of a donation – protect a rhino or adopt a rhino, doc, researcher, keeper, or purchase one of SOS Rhino’s products: a T-shirt, hat, or video. Visit today, and give from your heart.

Click to read the full news article

Contribute to the “SOS Rhino Annelisa Memorial Fund”
SOS Rhino has established memorial fund in Dr. Annelisa Kilbourn’s name to help continue her work dedicated to the survival of the Sumatran rhino in Malaysia. Contributions can be made by clicking the button below or mailed directly to SOS Rhino (checks should be made out to “SOS RHINO”)680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60611. attn: Annelisa Fund. 312.335.0868, fax 312.335.0076. Inquires emailed to info@sosrhino.org.

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Volunteer
SOS RHINO is looking for volunteers interested in helping us in our efforts to save the Sumatran rhinoceros. Our Borneo Team is studying the demographics of the remaining animals in Tabin Wildlife Reserve to determine when patrol units, habitat protection, or translocation may play a role in the rhinos' survival. Read more:

Click to read the full news article

Participate in the Borneo Rhino Challenge 2006 Fundraiser
SOS RHINO invites you to climb to the summit of Mt. Kinabalu, cycle the Northern tip of Borneo, and help us search for the elusive Sumatran rhinoceros of Borneo. You'll see an astonishing variety of rare and endemic plants, primates, and birds during your trek and cycle in some of the most beautiful areas of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. As part of the challenge you will join SOS Rhino's field staff deep in the jungles of Tabin Wildlife Reserve, in search of the last remaining small, shy forest rhinos of Malaysian Borneo.

Click to read the full news article


7. Trivia Answers


1. TRUE. Rhino horn grows from the rhino's skin and not from the skull like a true horn.

2. Despite the name, the black rhino differs from the white rhino not by color but by size and being a browser rather than a grazer.

3. No subspecies have been described, but Assam and Nepal populations might show slight differences.

8. About Us

SOS Rhino is a non-profit, international foundation dedicated to preserving the five rhinoceros species in their natural habitats. Our conservation programs combine research, education, marketing and advocacy, all working collectively to achieve sustainable results.

Through diverse stakeholder support, SOS Rhino develops and funds rhino conservation and awareness programs appropriate to individual countries, providing these countries with the information and tools to build lasting rhino conservation.

It is our goal to secure a place for this ancient animal in tomorrow’s world.

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