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  SOS Rhino : In The News : Newsletter : November 2004


SOS Rhino Review
November 2004

Welcome to the SOS Rhino Review, a newsletter about rhinos from SOS Rhino. You’ll find links to interesting articles here as well as a few surprises! We have provided some updates on our efforts to save rhinos all over the world. Let us know if you’d rather not receive this newsletter.

And now, let's go to the rhino news.

1. About Us
2. World Rhino News
3. Feature Stories
4. Donor Appreciation
5. Find It On Our Web Site
6. Trivia Questions
7. How You Can Help
8. Trivia Answers


Full Stories Are Available Via Web Links

1. About Us

SOS Rhino is a non-profit, international foundation dedicated to preserving the five rhinoceros species in their natural habitats. Our conservation programs combine research, education, marketing and advocacy, all working collectively to achieve sustainable results.

Through diverse stakeholder support, SOS Rhino develops and funds rhino conservation and awareness programs appropriate to individual countries, providing these countries with the information and tools to build lasting rhino conservation.

It is our goal to secure a place for this ancient animal in tomorrow’s world.

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2. World Rhino News

Dark days ahead for rhino
Conservationists are aghast at the way proposals from Namibia and South Africa, to allow export quotas for trophy hunting of the black rhinoceros, have been accepted at the 13th Meeting of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (Cites).

Click to read the full news article

Southeast Asia takes aim at illegal wildlife trade
The 10-member Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) pledged to share intelligence, review weak laws and tighten borders in a region that accounts for a quarter of the global illegal trade in animals and plants.

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3. Featured Stories

SOS Rhino goes to Africa
In August 2004, Dr. Petra Kretzschmar, Science Director and Program Coordinator of SOS Rhino went to South Africa to conduct a project on a private game farm in the Limpopo Province of South Africa. This project involves the update of the existing data file of black and white rhinos and the collection of skin samples for genetic analysis. This project is part of a long-term study which started in 1997 as part of Dr. Petra’s PhD. The following journal describes Dr. Petra’s experience and gives background information on the project.

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4. Donor Appreciation

SOS RHINO wishes to acknowledge the following individuals, organizations, and foundations for their generous support of our programs. Their support comes in many forms: donation of their expertise and time, funds for specific programs and equipment, and donation of products. THANK YOU!

Click HERE to view the list of our donors!

 

5. Find It On Our Web Site

BORNEO RHINO CHALLENGE 2005
Trek, Cycle, and Quest for the Sumatran Rhino of Borneo

SOS RHINO invites you to climb to the summit of Mt. Kinabalu, cycle the Northern tip of Borneo, and help us search for the elusive Sumatran rhinoceros of Borneo. You’ll see an astonishing variety of rare and endemic plants, primates, and birds during your trek and cycle in some of the most beautiful areas of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. As part of the challenge you will join SOS Rhino’s field staff deep in the jungles of Tabin Wildlife Reserve, in search of the last remaining small, shy forest rhinos of Malaysian Borneo.

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Rhino Links
Visit our LINKS page for organizations and institutions that SOS Rhino works with or has worked with, knows, or just thinks you should know. It is by no means complete, so if you have other links you think should be listed on this site, send their addresses and some information on the organizations to info@sosrhino.org.

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6. Trivia Questions


1. TRUE OR FALSE: Rhino horns are not real horns.

2. What term is used to describe a congregation of rhinos?

3. Why do rhinos have horns?


7. How You Can Help

Adopt a rhino, doc or keeper. Buy a t-shirt, hat, or video
There are only 300 Sumatran rhinos left on Earth. Without direct help from generous humans, they may never be seen again. We urge you to give what you can in the form of a donation – protect a rhino or adopt a rhino, doc, researcher, keeper, or purchase one of SOS Rhino’s products: a T-shirt, hat, or video. Visit today, and give from your heart.

Click to read the full news article

Contribute to the “SOS Rhino Annelisa Memorial Fund”
SOS Rhino has established memorial fund in Dr. Annelisa Kilbourn’s name to help continue her work dedicated to the survival of the Sumatran rhino in Malaysia. Contributions can be made by clicking the button below or mailed directly to SOS Rhino (checks should be made out to “SOS RHINO”)680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60611. attn: Annelisa Fund. 312.335.0868, fax 312.335.0076. Inquires emailed to info@sosrhino.org.

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Volunteer
SOS RHINO is looking for volunteers interested in helping us in our efforts to save the Sumatran rhinoceros. Our Borneo Team is studying the demographics of the remaining animals in Tabin Wildlife Reserve to determine when patrol units, habitat protection, or translocation may play a role in the rhinos' survival. Read more:

Click to read the full news article

Participate in SOS Rhino’s Annual Borneo Rhino Challenge Fundraiser
As part of the challenge you will join SOS Rhino’s field staff deep in the jungles of Tabin Wildlife Reserve, in search of the last remaining small, shy forest rhinos of Malaysian Borneo.

Click to read the full news article


8. Trivia Answers


1. TRUE. Rhino horn grows from the rhino's skin and not from the skull like a true horn.

2. Modern writers refer to a congregation of rhinoceroses as a "crash". This is sometimes found in crosswords or quizzes. "Herd" would not be zoologically correct because rhinos do not stay in one group for long. Scientists still use "groups" for the rhinoceros and it is a correct term.

3. The horns are very well developed in the two species in Africa, but much smaller in the three species in Asia. The Asian species certainly do not use the horns to fight or to defend themselves, they use their incisors (sharp front teeth). The horns have come about in evolution and they had (have) a general function to impress members of the opposite sex. Horns are also used for digging in waterbeds to find water, or to uproot shrubs etc. Some rhinos use the horn to guide their offspring. This is generally the front horn, the second horn does not have a very specific purpose at the moment. We suppose that they had some purpose in the course of evolution.




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