SOS Rhino Specials
Rhino Species
Rhino FAQ

  SOS Rhino : In The News : Newsletter : November 2005


SOS Rhino Review
November 2005

Welcome to the SOS Rhino Review, a newsletter about rhinos from SOS Rhino. You’ll find links to interesting articles here as well as updates on our efforts to save rhinos all over the world. Let us know if you’d rather not receive this newsletter.

And now, let's go to the rhino news.

1. Feature Stories
2. World Rhino News
3. Donor Appreciation
4. Find It On Our Web Site
5. Trivia Questions
6. How You Can Help
7. Trivia Answers
8. About Us


Full Stories Are Available Via Web Links

 

1. Feature Stories

RHINO PROTECTION UNITS
By Dr. Edwin Bosi   The Rhino Protection Unit or popularly called RPU is the pillar of Sumatran rhino conservation in Sabah, Malaysia. When rhinos are found in a habitat, it must be protected at all cost otherwise, other activities for the species become irrelevant. Presently, SOS Rhino (Borneo) has three RPUs consisting of 15 persons. Each RPU is led by a Team Leader and four Field Assistants. There are four base camps - two in the north, one in the west and another one in the southeast part of the reserve. To effectively protect the 120500 hectares Tabin reserve, at least nine RPUs are required.

Click to read the full news article

2. World Rhino News

Zimbabwe moves rhinos from poachers' zone: report
Zimbabwe is home to some of Africa's largest game reserves, but local conservationists say many species are at risk from rampant poaching by people struggling with hunger and rising poverty. Cross-border trophy hunters are also taking a toll.

Click to read the full news article

Arms used for killing rhinos found in Chitwan
The security forces of Royal Chitwan National Park (RCNP) recently found a modern rifle and other equipment being used by the smugglers to poach one-horned rhino in the area.

Click to read the full news article

3. Donor Appreciation

SOS RHINO wishes to acknowledge the following individuals, organizations, and foundations for their generous support of our programs. Their support comes in many forms: donation of their expertise and time, funds for specific programs and equipment, and donation of products. THANK YOU!

Click HERE to view the list of our donors!

4. Find It On Our Web Site

SOS RHINO BORNEO:  In Situ
The in-situ component of SOS Rhino’s Borneo Project is dedicated to evaluating the Bornean subspecies of the Sumatran rhino in their remaining habitat in the wild. SOS Rhino Team members are undertaking very intensive work at Tabin Wildlife Reserve, Sabah, Borneo -- an area suspected to have the largest remaining population of these highly endangered animals.

Click to read the full news article

5. Trivia Questions


1. TRUE OR FALSE: Rhino horns are not real horns.

2. What term is used to describe a congregation of rhinos?

3. What are the reasons for the continual decreasing rhino population ?


6 . How You Can Help

Adopt a rhino, doc or keeper. Buy a t-shirt, hat, or video
There are only 300 Sumatran rhinos left on Earth. Without direct help from generous humans, they may never be seen again. We urge you to give what you can in the form of a donation – protect a rhino or adopt a rhino, doc, researcher, keeper, or purchase one of SOS Rhino’s products: a T-shirt, hat, or video. Visit today, and give from your heart.

Click to read the full news article

Contribute to the “SOS Rhino Annelisa Memorial Fund”
SOS Rhino has established memorial fund in Dr. Annelisa Kilbourn’s name to help continue her work dedicated to the survival of the Sumatran rhino in Malaysia. Contributions can be made by clicking the button below or mailed directly to SOS Rhino (checks should be made out to “SOS RHINO”)680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60611. attn: Annelisa Fund. 312.335.0868, fax 312.335.0076. Inquires emailed to info@sosrhino.org.

Click to read the full news article

Volunteer
SOS RHINO is looking for volunteers interested in helping us in our efforts to save the Sumatran rhinoceros. Our Borneo Team is studying the demographics of the remaining animals in Tabin Wildlife Reserve to determine when patrol units, habitat protection, or translocation may play a role in the rhinos' survival. Read more:

Click to read the full news article

Participate in the Borneo Rhino Challenge 2006 Fundraiser
SOS RHINO invites you to climb to the summit of Mt. Kinabalu, cycle the Northern tip of Borneo, and help us search for the elusive Sumatran rhinoceros of Borneo. You'll see an astonishing variety of rare and endemic plants, primates, and birds during your trek and cycle in some of the most beautiful areas of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. As part of the challenge you will join SOS Rhino's field staff deep in the jungles of Tabin Wildlife Reserve, in search of the last remaining small, shy forest rhinos of Malaysian Borneo.

Click to read the full news article


7. Trivia Answers


1. TRUE. Rhino horn grows from the rhino's skin and not from the skull like a true horn.

2. Modern writers refer to a congregation of rhinoceroses as a "crash". This is sometimes found in crosswords or quizzes. "Herd" would not be zoologically correct because rhinos do not stay in one group for long. Scientists still use "groups" for the rhinoceros and it is a correct term.

3. Its natural habitat is taken away by the growing human population. Land is converted for use in agriculture or roads, forests are still logged for hardwood. It is also highly priced for its horn, which is supposed to have medicinal properties. This belief is very common in Far Eastern countries like China.

8. About Us

SOS Rhino is a non-profit, international foundation dedicated to preserving the five rhinoceros species in their natural habitats. Our conservation programs combine research, education, marketing and advocacy, all working collectively to achieve sustainable results.

Through diverse stakeholder support, SOS Rhino develops and funds rhino conservation and awareness programs appropriate to individual countries, providing these countries with the information and tools to build lasting rhino conservation.

It is our goal to secure a place for this ancient animal in tomorrow’s world.

Click to read the full news article




Privacy Policy

   


More Newsletters::

Current
Archive