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  SOS Rhino : In The News : Newsletter : November 2006


SOS Rhino Review
November 2006

Welcome to the SOS Rhino Review, a newsletter about rhinos from SOS Rhino. You’ll find links to interesting articles here as well as updates on our efforts to save rhinos all over the world. Let us know if you’d rather not receive this newsletter.

And now, let's go to the rhino news.

1. Feature Stories
2. World Rhino News
3. Donor Appreciation
4. Find It On Our Web Site
5. Frequently Asked Questions
6. How You Can Help
7. Answers to Frequently Asked Questions
8. About Us


Full Stories Are Available Via Web Links

 

1. Feature Stories

SAVE THE RHINO

The rare Sumatran rhino is now an endangered species. Only 300 are struggling to survive in Sumatra (Indonesia) and in Sabah.

It is one of the least studied (and therefore least known) mammals because of its elusive character and remote dwellings.

Dr Nan Schaffer, the president of SOS Rhino, a non-profit international organisation, shares her concerns for the slowly diminishing numbers of these animals.

"The rhinos are endangered because of their loss of habitat. The pockets of rhinos on the reserves are too small and too far apart for a productive population. Vast lands separate individual rhinos so it is difficult for them to find each other," she explained.

Click to read the full news article


2. World Rhino News

Reproductive world first for zoo
A miracle of science has occurred at Western Plains Zoo. A group of Berlin reproductive experts and Western Plains Zoo veterinarians have performed a world first by successfully harvesting eggs from a black rhinoceros for the purpose of in-vitro fertilisation (IVF).

Click to read the full news article

Human footprint too big for nature
Beijing, China/Gland, Switzerland - The world's natural ecosystems are being degraded at a rate unprecedented in human history, according to a report released today by WWF, the global conservation organization.

Click to read the full news article


3. Donor Appreciation

SOS RHINO wishes to acknowledge the following individuals, organizations, and foundations for their generous support of our programs. Their support comes in many forms: donation of their expertise and time, funds for specific programs and equipment, and donation of products. THANK YOU!

Click HERE to view the list of our donors!

4. Find It On Our Web Site

SOS Rhino and Tabin Wildlife Reserve announce the Rhino Survey Expedition in Borneo

The Rhino Survey Expedition in Borneo is a 7 Day, 6 Night program that combines a comfortable stay at the charming Tabin Wildlife Resort with a survey program where participants will join SOS Rhino Borneo’s Rhino Protection and Survey staff deep in the jungles of Tabin Wildlife Reserve, in search for signs of the elusive Sumatran rhino in its natural habitat.

Click to read the full news article

5. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

1. TRUE OR FALSE: Rhino horns are not real horns.

2. What term is used to describe a congregation of rhinos?

3. What are the reasons for the continual decreasing rhino population?


6 . How You Can Help

Adopt a rhino, doc or keeper. Buy a t-shirt, hat, or video
There are only 300 Sumatran rhinos left on Earth. Without direct help from generous humans, they may never be seen again. We urge you to give what you can in the form of a donation – protect a rhino or adopt a rhino, doc, researcher, keeper, or purchase one of SOS Rhino’s products: a T-shirt, hat, or video. Visit today, and give from your heart.

Click to read the full news article

Contribute to the “SOS Rhino Annelisa Memorial Fund”
SOS Rhino has established memorial fund in Dr. Annelisa Kilbourn’s name to help continue her work dedicated to the survival of the Sumatran rhino in Malaysia. Contributions can be made by clicking the button below or mailed directly to SOS Rhino (checks should be made out to “SOS RHINO”)680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60611. attn: Annelisa Fund. 312.335.0868, fax 312.335.0076. Inquires emailed to info@sosrhino.org.

Click to read the full news article

Volunteer
SOS RHINO is looking for volunteers interested in helping us in our efforts to save the Sumatran rhinoceros. Our Borneo Team is studying the demographics of the remaining animals in Tabin Wildlife Reserve to determine when patrol units, habitat protection, or translocation may play a role in the rhinos' survival. Read more:

Click to read the full news article


7. Answers to Frequently Asked Questions


1. TRUE. Rhino horn grows from the rhino's skin and not from the skull like a true horn.

2. Modern writers refer to a congregation of rhinoceroses as a "crash". This is sometimes found in crosswords or quizzes. "Herd" would not be zoologically correct because rhinos do not stay in one group for long. Scientists still use "groups" for the rhinoceros and it is a correct term.

3. Its natural habitat is taken away by the growing human population. Land is converted for use in agriculture or roads, forests are still logged for hardwood. It is also highly priced for its horn, which is supposed to have medicinal properties. This belief is very common in Far Eastern countries like China.

8. About Us

SOS Rhino is a non-profit, international foundation dedicated to preserving the five rhinoceros species in their natural habitats. Our conservation programs combine research, education, marketing and advocacy, all working collectively to achieve sustainable results.

Through diverse stakeholder support, SOS Rhino develops and funds rhino conservation and awareness programs appropriate to individual countries, providing these countries with the information and tools to build lasting rhino conservation.

It is our goal to secure a place for this ancient animal in tomorrow’s world.

Click to read the full news article






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